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Have you ever wondered who’s in the Patriots Hall of Fame?

Tom Brady, the legendary quarterback who spent 20 seasons with the New England Patriots, was honored in a special ceremony during the team’s season-opening game against the Philadelphia Eagles. The halftime ceremony at Gillette Stadium drew a packed crowd, and Brady addressed the fans with gratitude.

During the ceremony, Robert Kraft made two important announcements. First, they’re making the process of inducting people into the Patriots Hall of Fame faster. Second, they’re going to hold the Hall of Fame ceremony at Gillette Stadium on June 12, 2024, to include more fans. They picked this date because it’s related to Tom Brady’s career, with his six Super Bowl wins and the number 12 on his jersey. Season Ticket Members will get first dibs on tickets, and more details will be shared later.

 

Brady doesn’t have to wait for the usual four-year period to get into the Hall of Fame. They made a special exception just for him. So, Brady will be the 35th person to be inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame presented by RTX.

The Patriots Hall of Fame, sponsored by RTX, is the most important attraction at Patriot Place (besides the stadium, of course). It’s unique because it combines sports history and education. With lots of cool multimedia displays and old stuff, it shows off the New England Patriots’ history and teaches kids about math and science. Plus, it’s where you can see the Patriots’ six Lombardi Trophies.

 

Philadelphia Eagles v New England Patriots

New England Patriots President Jonathan Kraft, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft clap as former New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady celebrates during a ceremony honoring Brady at halftime of New England’s game against the Philadelphia Eagles at Gillette Stadium.

 

With its 20,000 square feet of exhibit space, located above the Patriots’ Pro Shop, it allows fans to relive the team’s history and celebrate legendary players who’ve been inducted into the Hall of Fame, such as Willie McGinest, Tedy Bruschi, Drew Bledsoe, Ty Law, and many more. It’s a must-visit for football and New England Patriots enthusiasts.

As Patriots fans eagerly await next June, here’s the complete list of players and individuals inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame.

  • Mike Vrabel | Linebacker | 2001-2008 | #50

    Vrabel

    FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS – OCTOBER 22: Former player Mike Vrabel speaks during a New England Patriots Hall of Fame induction ceremony during halftime of the game against the Buffalo Bills at Gillette Stadium on October 22, 2023 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

    Vrabel, who played linebacker, joined the Patriots as a free agent in 2001 and stayed with the team through 2008. His playing career also included time with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Kansas City Chiefs. He coached at Ohio State and for the Houston Texans before becoming the head coach of the Tennessee Titans in 2018.

  • Dante Scarnecchia | Assistant coach | 1985-2019

    dante

    FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS – OCTOBER 22: Former coach Dante Scarnecchia speaks during a New England Patriots Hall of Fame induction ceremony during halftime of the game against the Buffalo Bills at Gillette Stadium on October 22, 2023 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

     

    Scarnecchia, who spent 34 seasons with the team, is widely regarded as one of the best offensive line coaches in NFL history and has impacted many players throughout his career. He retired after the 2019 season and his induction into the Hall of Fame is a well-deserved honor.

  • Vince Wilfork | Defensive Tackle | 2004-2014 | #75

    wilfork

    FOXBORO, MA – JANUARY 22: Vince Wilfork #75 of the New England Patriots celebrates after defeating the Baltimore Ravens in the AFC Championship Game at Gillette Stadium on January 22, 2012 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. The New England Patriots defeated the Baltimore Ravens 20-23. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

     

    Wilfork is one of the greatest defensive linemen in the history of the team. He spent most of his career, 11 out of 13 seasons, with the Patriots and helped them win two Super Bowl Championships. The Patriots drafted him in 2004 from the University of Miami (Fla.). During his time with the team, he played in 158 games, starting in 148 of them, and contributed to their impressive 123-35 record. He also played in 21 playoff games, including six AFC Championship Games and four Super Bowls. Wilfork was a seven-time team captain, received five Pro Bowl selections and four All-Pro honors, and the Patriots had a top-10 defense eight times during his career.

  • Tracy Sormanti | Cheerleading Director | 1983 - 2020

     

    Tracy Sormanti was part of the Patriots cheerleading team for a long time. She first joined as a cheerleader in 1983, took a break, and then cheered again from 1991 to 1993. After Robert Kraft bought the Patriots in 1994, he made her the Cheerleading Director. During her 27 years in charge, her squads performed at many Super Bowls, visited numerous countries and military bases, and did a lot of community work. Sormanti focused on values like commitment, dedication, responsibility, and positivity. Sadly, she passed away at age 58 on December 4, 2020, due to an illness called multiple myeloma.

  • Richard Seymour | Defensive End | 2001-2008 | #93

    seymore

    PITTSBURGH – SEPTEMBER 25: Richard Seymour #93 of the New England Patriots celebrates a play against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Heinz Field on September 25, 2005 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Pats defeated the Steelers 23-20. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

     

    Seymour spent eight of his 12 NFL seasons with the Patriots and played a big part in winning six division titles, four conference championships, and three Super Bowls for New England. He was chosen for five consecutive Pro Bowls from 2002 to 2006 and received three first-team All-Pro honors in a row from 2003 to 2005. He holds the record for the most Pro Bowl selections of any Patriots defensive lineman since 1970. Seymour also served as team co-captain four times. In 2009, he was named to the Patriots’ 50th Anniversary Team and the 2000s All-Decade Team. In 2022, Seymour was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

  • Rodney Harrison | Safety | 2003 - 2008 | #37

    harrison

    FOXBORO, MA – DECEMBER 12: Rodney Harrison #37 of the New England Patriots talks to Chad Johnson #85 of the Cincinnati Bengals after Johnson was unable to catch a ball in the end zone at Gillette Stadium on December 12, 2004 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. The Patriots won 35-28. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

     

    Harrison played 15 years in the NFL, starting with the Chargers for nine seasons and finishing with the Patriots for six seasons. He played a big role in the Patriots winning two Super Bowls in 2003 and 2004. In the playoffs, he had seven interceptions in nine games for the Patriots, including two in Super Bowl XXXIX. Harrison was a strong tackler, leading the Patriots and all NFL defensive backs in tackles for his first two years in New England. He also contributed two sacks, six interceptions, seven passes defended, and two forced fumbles in the six games leading to the back-to-back Super Bowl wins. He holds the record for the most sacks by a defensive back with 30.5, including nine with the Patriots. Harrison is the only defensive back in NFL history to have both 30 sacks and 30 interceptions, with eight of those interceptions coming during his time with the Patriots. He was a team captain in all six of his seasons with the Patriots.

  • Leon Gray | Offensive Tackle | 1973 - 1978 | #70

     

    Leon Gray joined the Patriots in 1973 after the Dolphins let him go before the season started. He stayed with the Patriots for six years and played a big role in their record-breaking rushing attack. In 1978, along with Patriots Hall of Famers John Hannah, Sam Cunningham, and Steve Grogan, Gray helped the team set an NFL rushing record with 3,165 yards, a record that still stands. The 1978 team was also the first Patriots squad to win the AFC Eastern Division title. In 1977, Gray was part of an offensive line that did a great job protecting the quarterback, with Grogan being sacked only 14 times all season. The combination of Gray and Hannah on the left side of the Patriots’ offensive line was considered the best tackle-guard duo in the NFL. In 2019, Gray was inducted as the 28th member of the Patriots Hall of Fame, and he was the third to be elected by the Senior Selection Committee.

  • Matt Light | Offensive Tackle | 2001 - 2011 | #72

    light

    FOXBORO, MA – DECEMBER 27: Tackle Matt Light #72 of the New England Patriots strares down linebacker Takeo Spikes #51 of the Buffalo Bills during the game on December 27, 2003 at Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts in Landover, Maryland. The Patriots crushed the Bills 31-0. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

     

    Matt Light played his entire 11-year NFL career with the Patriots. He played a big part in the team’s success, contributing to 11 consecutive winning seasons, nine division championships, five conference titles, and three Super Bowl wins. Light was drafted in the second round of the 2001 NFL Draft from Purdue and played as the team’s left tackle, protecting Tom Brady’s blind side for over a decade. He’s one of a few players, along with Brady, who started in at least five Super Bowls. Light is the fourth player to enter the Patriots Hall of Fame with three Super Bowl rings, following Kevin Faulk, Tedy Bruschi, and Troy Brown. He’s also the sixth player chosen by the fans for the Patriots Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, joining Drew Bledsoe, Troy Brown, Tedy Bruschi, Kevin Faulk, and Ty Law.

  • Raymond Clayborn | Cornerback | 1977 - 1989 | #26

    raymond

    23 Nov 1988: Defensive back Raymond Clayborn of the New England Patriots (left) and Buffalo Bills wide receiver Trumaine Johnson go up for the ball during a game at Rich Stadium in Orchard Park, New York. The Bills won the game, 23-20. Mandatory Credit:

     

    Raymond Clayborn had a 13-year career with the Patriots from 1977 to 1989. He was a three-time Pro Bowl player in 1983, 1985, and 1986. The Patriots drafted him in the first round in 1977 from Texas, and he quickly became one of the best cornerbacks in the game and an excellent kickoff returner. Clayborn holds the franchise record with 36 career interceptions, a record that still stands today, 28 years after he left the Patriots. He also ranks second in franchise history for interception return yards, with 555 yards, just behind Ty Law’s 583 return yards. Clayborn returned 57 kickoffs for 1,538 yards and scored three touchdowns. In his rookie year in 1977, he returned 28 kickoffs for 869 yards, leading the NFL with a 31.0-yard return average and three kickoffs returned for touchdowns, which are still franchise records. He’s one of only 20 NFL players since the 1970 merger to finish a season with a kickoff return average of over 30.0 yards (minimum 20 returns), and he’s the only Patriots player to achieve this.

  • Kevin Faulk | Running Back | 1999-2011 | #33

    faulk

    New England Patriots running back Kevin Faulk runs for yardage during a game against the Buffalo Bills at Ralph Wilson Stadium in Orchard Park, New York on December 11, 2005. New England won the game 35-7. (Photo by Mark Konezny/NFLPhotoLibrary)

     

    Kevin Faulk had a 13-year career with the Patriots, ending in 2011, where he played multiple roles since being drafted in 1999 from Louisiana State. He set several franchise records, including all-purpose yards, kickoff return yards, and combined return yards, ranking in the top five for rushing yards and receptions in team history. Over his career, he played in 161 regular season games, rushing for 3,607 yards with 16 touchdowns, catching 431 passes with 15 touchdowns, and excelling in kick and punt returns. Faulk holds the franchise record for running back receptions and is one of only 30 running backs in NFL history with over 400 receptions. He was among a select group of players to achieve both 3,000 rushing and 3,000 receiving yards in the 2000s, contributing significantly to the Patriots’ success with 11 winning seasons, three Super Bowl titles, and five AFC Championships during his time in New England. Faulk’s contributions earned him a spot on the Patriots’ all-decade (2000s) and 50th Anniversary teams as a return specialist.

  • Willie McGinest | Linebacker/Defensive End | 1994-2005 | #55

    McGinest

    PITTSBURGH – JANUARY 23: Linebacker Willie McGinest #55 of the New England Patriots celebrates victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC championship game at Heinz Field on January 23, 2005 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Patriots defeated the Steelers 41-27 to advance to the Super Bowl. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

     

    Willie McGinest was the fourth overall pick in the first round of the 1994 NFL Draft from the University of Southern California. He spent 12 of his 15 NFL seasons with the Patriots and was a key part of the team’s success during their Super Bowl victories in 2001, 2003, and 2004. He’s third in team history with 78 sacks and led the team in sacks six times, with his highest being 11 in 1995. McGinest holds the NFL record for postseason sacks with 16, and he set a record for the most sacks in a single postseason game with 4.5 in a 2005 Wild Card win against Jacksonville.

    One of his most memorable moments was when he stopped Indianapolis running back Edgerrin James at the goal line with 11 seconds left in a 2003 regular-season game, securing a 38-34 victory. McGinest was a versatile player, switching between defensive end and linebacker, and earned Pro Bowl honors in 1996 and 2003. He played a significant role in the Patriots having nine winning seasons in 12 years, winning six division titles, four conference championships, and three Super Bowl championships during his career.

  • Houston Antwine | Defensive Lineman | 1961-1971 | #65

     

    Houston Antwine played 11 seasons for the Patriots from 1961 to 1971, participating in 142 games. He was a leader in sacks for the Patriots for three straight seasons from 1967 to 1969, and he has 39 career sacks, which is tied for 10th place on the Patriots’ all-time career sacks list (with Richard Seymour).

    Antwine was selected to the American Football League (AFL) All-Star team for six consecutive years, from 1963 to 1968. His six All-Star appearances are tied for the fourth-highest total in franchise history. He was acquired in a trade with the Houston Oilers in exchange for a fourth-round pick in the 1962 AFL Draft on April 1, 1961. Antwine is also a member of the Patriots’ 50th Anniversary Team and the 1960s All-Decade Team.

  • Ty Law | Cornerback | 1995-2004 | #24

    ty law

    EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ – DECEMBER 20: Ty Law #24 of the New England Patriots intercepts a pass intended for Santana Moss #83 of the New York Jets on December 20, 2003 at Giant Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Patriots won 21-16. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

     

    Ty Law spent a decade with the Patriots from 1995 to 2004 after being drafted in the first round from Michigan. He won three Super Bowl Championships, was a four-time Pro Bowler, and a two-time All-Pro during his Patriots career. Law holds franchise records with 36 interceptions, 583 interception-return yards, and six interception return touchdowns. In 1998, he led the NFL in interceptions with nine. Law was a playmaker in the postseason, notably scoring the first points in the 2001 Super Bowl with a pick-six. He was part of the record-breaking 2003 Patriots defense. Law is a member of multiple all-decade and all-time teams and was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2014.

  • Tedy Bruschi | Linebacker | 1996-2008 | #54

    tedy

    FOXBORO, MA – JANUARY 16: Tedy Bruschi #54 of the New England Patriots recovers a fumble from the Indianapolis Colts during the AFC divisional playoff game at Gillette Stadium on January 16, 2005 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. The Patriots defeated the Colts 20-3. (Photo By Elsa/Getty Images)

     

    Tedy Bruschi, a true Patriot for 13 seasons in New England, was praised by Bill Belichick as the “perfect player.” He was a seven-time team captain known for his unwavering work ethic and intense on-field performance, making him a favorite among fans.

    Drafted by the Patriots in 1996, Bruschi played in five Super Bowls, winning three championships. He played a key role in the team’s 11 winning seasons, nine playoff appearances, including eight division titles, and three Super Bowl victories. In his 211 career games, the Patriots had a 144-67 record, with a 16-6 playoff record.

    Bruschi earned his first Pro Bowl selection after the 2004 season, co-captaining a defense that allowed the franchise’s third-lowest points per game at just 16.25. Known for clutch plays, he is the only NFL player to return four consecutive interceptions for touchdowns and ranks second in Patriots history with four pick-sixes.

  • Gil Santos | Radio Play-By-Play | 1988 - 2012

     

    Gil Santos had an illustrious 36-season career as the Patriots’ voice, earning the title “Voice of the New England Patriots” and calling 743 games. He was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame and received this honor from owner Robert Kraft, marking the highest recognition from the team. Santos began in 1966, and after a brief hiatus in the 1980s, he returned in 1991 and continued until retiring in 2012. Additionally, he was a respected sports director at WBZ News Radio in Boston, retired in 2009 after 38 years, and entered the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame the same year. Santos also lent his voice to basketball and football games, earning a well-deserved place in the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2013.

  • Troy Brown | Wide receiver | 1993-2007 | #80

    troy brown

    KANSAS CITY, MO – NOVEMBER 27: Troy Brown #80 of the New England Patriots carries the ball during the game against the Kansas City Chiefs on November 27, 2005 at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. The Chiefs won 26-16. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

     

    Troy Brown had an outstanding 15-year career with the Patriots from 1993 to 2007, excelling as a receiver, punt returner, and defensive back. He retired as their all-time leading receiver with 557 receptions and top punt returner with 252 returns, ranking second in receiving yards and sharing the record for three punt return touchdowns. Brown played in 192 games, placing fourth in all-time games played for the team, and tied for the second-longest tenure with 15 seasons. He played a vital role in three Super Bowl victories, earned a Pro Bowl selection in 2001, and even contributed as a defensive back in 2004, recording three interceptions. His exceptional versatility and clutch performances earned him a well-deserved spot in the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2012.

  • Jon Morris | Center | 1964-1974 | #56

    The Patriots' team Hall of Fame before a game at Gillette Stadium. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

    The Patriots’ team Hall of Fame before a game at Gillette Stadium. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

     

    Jon Morris had an 11-season tenure with the Patriots from 1964 to 1974, appearing in 130 games. He earned seven consecutive All-Star selections, including six AFL-All Star games from 1964 to 1969, and in 1970, he became an AFC Pro Bowl center. His seven league All-Star selections are second only to Pro Football Hall of Famer John Hannah’s nine in Patriots history. Morris was not only the first Patriots player to make the NFL Pro Bowl but also played a vital role on the offensive line, contributing to Jim Nance’s team-record 45 rushing touchdowns from 1965 to 1971. Drafted by both the Patriots and the Green Bay Packers, he chose the AFL and the Patriots. Following his playing career, Morris transitioned into a role as a color commentator for Patriots radio broadcasts from 1979 to 1987 and provided color analysis for NFL games on NBC television. Morris also had stints with the Detroit Lions (1975-77) and Chicago Bears (1978) before his induction into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2011.

  • Drew Bledsoe | Quarterback | 1993-2001 | #11

    drew

    23 Sep 2001: Quarterback Drew Bledsoe #11 of the New England Patriots drops back to pass against the New York Jets during their game at Foxboro Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts. The Jets won 10-3. DIGITAL IMAGE. Mandatory Credit: Ezra Shaw/ALLSPORT

     

    Drew Bledsoe, the top pick in the 1993 NFL Draft, served as the face of the Patriots for eight years, setting numerous team records for passing attempts, completions, and yards during his nine-year career with the team. He also holds single-season records for passing attempts and completions, and he’s the sole player in franchise history to pass for over 400 yards in multiple games (4). Bledsoe holds the NFL record for pass attempts in a season (691 in 1994) and game records for attempts (70) and completions (45) against Minnesota in 1994, which ignited a seven-game win streak and led the Patriots to their first playoff appearance in eight years. During his first six seasons, he led the Patriots to the playoffs four times, securing back-to-back division titles and three consecutive playoff berths for the first time in team history. In 1996, Bledsoe guided the team to its second AFC Championship and a Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl XXXI. He is also the only quarterback in NFL history with four seasons of at least 600 pass attempts, accomplishing this feat in three consecutive years with the Patriots from 1994 to 1996.

  • Sam Cunningham | Running back | 1973-1979, 1981-82 | #39

    Mar 17, 2020; Foxborough, Massachusetts, USA; A general view of the New England Patriot Hall of Fame Store at Gillette Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports

    Mar 17, 2020; Foxborough, Massachusetts, USA; A general view of the New England Patriot Hall of Fame Store at Gillette Stadium. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports

     

    Sam Cunningham had a nine-season tenure with the Patriots, playing in 107 games from 1973 to 1979 and then in 1981-1982. He holds the record as the Patriots’ all-time leading rusher with 5,453 yards, ranking second in team history with 43 rushing touchdowns. Cunningham played a crucial role in the Patriots setting an NFL record for the most rushing yards in a season, totaling 3,165 yards in 1978. Drafted in the first round by the Patriots in 1973 after an All-American career at USC, he earned the nickname Sam “Bam” Cunningham in college for his ability to dive over piles into the end zone. He’s honored as a member of the Patriots’ 50th Anniversary Team and the 1970s All-Decade Team, and he was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2010. Cunningham currently resides in California.

  • Jim Nance | Fullback | 1965-1971 | #35

    In 2009, during the Patriots’ 50th anniversary celebration, fans got to vote for one of three finalists to be inducted into the team’s Hall of Fame. The honor went posthumously to fullback Jim Nance, making him the 14th player and the first running back inducted into the Hall of Fame. Nance played for the Patriots for seven seasons, from 1965 to 1971, and was named the AFL’s MVP in 1966 when he rushed for 1,458 yards and 11 touchdowns. He was the first AFL back to surpass 1,000 rushing yards in consecutive seasons and holds the team record with 104.1 rushing yards per game in 1966. Nance has the most rushing touchdowns in team history with 45, and his 5,323 rushing yards rank second to Sam Cunningham. He was also selected for the Patriots All-Time Team in 2009. Nance was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2009.

  • Billy Sullivan | Owner | 1963 - 1988

    In 2009, as part of the New England Patriots’ 50th-anniversary celebration, Patriots Chairman and CEO Robert Kraft paid tribute to the franchise’s original owner, Billy Sullivan, by inducting him into the Patriots Hall of Fame as a contributor, marking the first time a contributor received this honor. In 1959, Sullivan and a group of entrepreneurs joined forces to secure the eighth and final AFL franchise, challenging the established NFL. Despite facing numerous challenges, this group, known as “The Foolish Club,” succeeded. In 1970, the two leagues merged, and Sullivan continued to own the club until 1988 when he sold it to Victor Kiam, famous for his razor business. Sullivan’s efforts laid the foundation for the present-day Patriots, with highlights including the 1963 Patriots playing for the AFL Championship and the team making NFL playoffs appearances in 1976, 1978, 1982, 1985, and 1986, including winning an AFC Championship and reaching the Super Bowl in 1985.

  • Ben Coates | Tight End | 1991-1999 | #87

    ben coates

    7 Sep 1998: Ben Coates #87 of the New England Patriots prepares to catch a ball prior to a game against the Denver Broncos at the Mile High Stadium in Denver, Colorado. The Broncos defeated the Patriots 27-21. Mandatory Credit: Brian Bahr /Allsport

    Ben Coates played nine seasons for the Patriots, appearing in 142 games with 105 starts. He was a top receiver, ranking third in team history in receptions (490), fourth in receiving yards (5,471), and second in receiving touchdowns (50) among tight ends. In 1994, he set a single-season record for receptions by a tight end with 96. Coates led the team in touchdown receptions for six straight seasons from 1993 to 1998 and in overall receptions five times. He was named to the Patriots Team of the Century in 2000 and is among the top 10 NFL tight ends in career receptions, yards, and touchdowns. Coates was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2008.

  • Stanley Morgan | Wide receiver | 1977-1989 | #86

    stanley Morgan

    NEW ORLEANS – JANUARY 26: Wide receiver Stanley Morgan #86 of the New England Patriots avoids the tackle as he carries the ball during Superbowl XX against the Chicago Bears at the Louisiana Superdome on January 26, 1986 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The Bears defeated the Pats 46-10. (Photo by Mike Powell/Getty Images)

    Stanley Morgan was a wide receiver for the Patriots from 1977 to 1989. He caught 534 passes during his career, which was a franchise record for 17 years until Troy Brown broke it. Morgan still holds the franchise record for receiving yards with 10,352 and is second with 67 touchdowns. His average of 19.2 yards per catch is an NFL record for those with over 500 career receptions. He made the Pro Bowl four times and was also a skilled punt returner. In 2007, Morgan was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame.

  • Bruce Armstrong | Offensive Tackle | 1987-2000 | #78

    bruce

    10 Dec 2000: Clyde Simmons #96 of the Chicago Bears moves on the field as he is stopped by Bruce Armstrong #78 of the New England Patriots at Soldier Field in Chicago, Illinois. The Bears defeated the Patriots 24-17.Mandatory Credit: Jonathan Daniel /Allsport

    Bruce Armstrong played in a record 212 games for the team, starting in every one of them. He made the Pro Bowl six times and is one of just three NFL players to play for the same team in three different decades. Despite being smaller for his tackle position, Armstrong was a key part of the offensive line in the late 1980s and 1990s. In 1999, he even played with three torn ligaments in his right knee and was named a Pro Bowl alternate that season. His matchups with Buffalo’s Hall of Fame defensive end Bruce Smith were famous during their careers. Armstrong was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 2001.

  • Steve Grogan | Quarterback | 1975-1990 | #14

    Former New England Patriots quarterback Steve Grogan, circa 1989. (Photo by Ken Levine/Getty Images)

    Former New England Patriots quarterback Steve Grogan, circa 1989. (Photo by Ken Levine/Getty Images)

    Steve Grogan was a tough and durable quarterback, playing for 16 years from 1975 to 1990. He’s a fan favorite and known for his athleticism, especially his rushing touchdowns. Grogan nearly took the 1976 team to the AFC Championship game, considered one of the best in team history. He’s among the top players in Patriots’ passing records and was also a hard hitter. Grogan was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1995 after a long tenure with the team. He now lives in both Massachusetts and Kansas.

  • Mike Haynes | Cornerback | 1976-1982 | #40

    mike haynes

    INDIANAPOLIS, IN – FEBRUARY 03: SiriusXM host and NFL Hall of Fame QB Fran Tarkenton (R) broadcasts live from Radio Row during Super Bowl XLVI Week in Indianapolis with guest Mike Haynes at the JW Marriott on February 3, 2012 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for SiriusXM)

    Mike Haynes played for the Patriots from 1976 to 1982 and was a top cornerback known for his man-to-man coverage skills. He made six Pro Bowls during his seven years with the Patriots and was also a talented punt returner, scoring two punt return touchdowns in his rookie season in 1976. After the 1982 season, he was traded to the Raiders, where he won two Super Bowl championships. Haynes was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1994 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1997. He’s also in the College Football Hall of Fame for his time at Arizona State University. Haynes currently lives in New York and works for the NFL.

  • Vito “Babe” Parilli | Quarterback | 1961-1967 | #15

    Vito “Babe” Parilli was the Patriots’ quarterback from 1961 to 1967, throwing for over 20,000 yards. He earned three American Football League All-Star selections and was named the AFL Comeback Player of the Year in 1966. Parilli was also known for his skill as a kick holder and earned the nickname “Gold Finger.” He and kicker/wide receiver Gino Cappelletti were a famous duo known as the “Grand Opera.” He was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982 for his time at the University of Kentucky.

  • Steve Nelson | Linebacker | 1974-1987 | #56

    Steve Nelson was a linebacker for the Patriots from 1974 to 1987. He made three Pro Bowls and had over 100 tackles nine times. Nelson led the team in tackles eight times and retired with a total of 1,776 tackles. After retiring, he coached for the Patriots and at Curry College. He’s now a football analyst on local TV and radio. Nelson was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993 and still lives in Massachusetts.

  • Jim Lee Hunt | Defensive lineman | 1960-1971 | #79

    FOXBOROUGH, MA: A view of New England Patriots helmets at Gillette Stadium on Oct. 17, 2021. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

    FOXBOROUGH, MA: A view of New England Patriots helmets at Gillette Stadium on Oct. 17, 2021. (Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

    Jim Lee Hunt played for the Patriots from 1960-71 as a defensive tackle. He was nicknamed “Earthquake” and was voted to four AFL All-Star games. In 1967, he was recognized as the best pass rushing tackle in the AFL. Hunt was known for his speed, once intercepting a pass and running it back for a 79-yard touchdown. An award for the best Patriots lineman was named after him, and John Hannah won it in 1981. Hunt was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993.

  • Bob Dee | Defensive Lineman | 1960-1967 | #89

    Gillette Stadium

    FOXBOROUGH, MA – OCTOBER 04: A general view before the game between the Indianapolis Colts and the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on October 4, 2018 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)

    Bob Dee was a durable player in the American Football League, never missing a game in his career. He played as a defensive lineman for the Patriots from 1960 to 1967 and started 112 consecutive games. He scored the first touchdown in AFL history by recovering a fumble in the end zone during a preseason game against Buffalo. Dee was selected for four AFL All-Star teams and inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1993.

  • Nick Buoniconti | Linebacker | 1962-1968 | #85

    Nick Buoniconti played linebacker for the Patriots from 1962-68 and was voted an American Football League All-Star five times. He was the top vote-getter in 1966. He attended law school at Suffolk University during the season and earned his law degree in 1968. In 1970, Buoniconti was named to the All-AFL team, which recognizes the best players in the league’s history. Len Dawson, a Hall of Fame quarterback, praised Buoniconti for his toughness. In 1992, he was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame, and in 2001, he was named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

  • Gino Cappelletti | Wide receiver/place-kicker | 1960-1970 | #20

    Gino Gappelletti at a Patriots Hall of Fame induction. (Courtesy of the New England Patriots)

    Gino Gappelletti at a Patriots Hall of Fame induction. (Courtesy of the New England Patriots)

    Gino Cappelletti is a well-known figure in Patriots history. He played as a wide receiver and kicker for the Patriots from 1960-70. He was the team’s top scorer until 2005. Cappelletti led the American Football League in scoring five times and had two of the top five scoring seasons in league history with 147 points in 1961 and 155 points in 1964. He was named the 1964 AFL Most Valuable Player and an AFL All-Star five times. Cappelletti is currently third on the Patriots’ all-time points list with 1,130 and is among the top ten receivers in team history. After retiring as a player, he became a broadcaster alongside his longtime partner Gil Santos, serving as the voices of the Patriots for many fans. In 1992, Cappelletti was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame.

  • John Hannah | Guard | 1973-1985 | #73

    John Hannah

    CANTON, OH – AUGUST 2: Andre Tippett, John Hannah (center) and owner Robert Kraft (right) of the New England Patriots pose with Tippett’s bust after his induction during the Class of 2008 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Fawcett Stadium on August 2, 2008 in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)

    John Hannah, known as one of the greatest offensive linemen of all time, played his entire career for the Patriots from 1973 to 1985. He was incredibly tough, missing just five games out of 183 due to injuries. He was a nine-time Pro Bowler and won Offensive Lineman of the Year four years in a row from 1978 to 1981. Hannah was a key part of the 1978 offensive line that set an NFL record with 3,165 rushing yards, a record that still stands. He entered the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1991, was the first member of the Patriots Hall of Fame, and also made it into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1999 for his outstanding college career at the University of Alabama under coach Bear Bryant.

  • Andre Tippett | Linebacker | 1982-1988, 1990-93 | #56

     

    Andre Tippett

    CANTON, OH – AUGUST 2: Andre Tippett of the New England Patriots salutes fans during the Class of 2008 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Ceremony at Fawcett Stadium on August 2, 2008 in Canton, Ohio. (Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images)

    Andre Tippett was a superb linebacker who spent his entire 12-year NFL career with the Patriots. He was known for his pass-rushing skills and holds the franchise record for career sacks with 100. In 1985, he was named the AFC’s Defensive Player of the Year. After retiring, Tippett worked for the Patriots and is now their Executive Director of Community Affairs. He was inducted into the Patriots Hall of Fame in 1999 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008. Tippett is active in local youth football and coaches a Pop Warner team.

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