Boston Celtics

  • L-R: Alabama G JD Davison, St. John's F Julian Champagnie, Purdue C Trevion Williams (Getty Images)

    L-R: Alabama G JD Davison, St. John’s F Julian Champagnie, Purdue C Trevion Williams (Getty Images)

    The NBA offseason is a quick turnaround. Just one week after having their season end in Game 6 of the NBA Finals, the Celtics will be on the clock in the NBA Draft.

    It’s not just to the day of Game 6, but could be to the hour as well. The Celtics will have a bit of a wait before their selection, after trading their first round pick (25th overall) to the San Antonio Spurs in the Derrick White trade deadline deal. Their lone remaining pick is their second rounder, which is the 53rd overall pick in the draft.

    Once the Celtics do get on the clock, there’s no real set guideline for them to follow. That late in the draft, and with the roster they currently have, they could realistically go with any position and either high floor or high ceiling players. With that said, which players stand out as logical fits? Here’s a look at some names to know…

  • G JD Davison, Alabama

    SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - MARCH 18: JD Davison #3 of the Alabama Crimson Tide dribbles against Prentiss Hubb #3 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the second half in the first round game of the 2022 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Viejas Arena at San Diego State University on March 18, 2022 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

    SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA – MARCH 18: JD Davison #3 of the Alabama Crimson Tide dribbles against Prentiss Hubb #3 of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during the second half in the first round game of the 2022 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament at Viejas Arena at San Diego State University on March 18, 2022 in San Diego, California. (Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

    Davison was a five-star recruit coming out of high school, ranked as the best recruit in the state of Alabama and 15th best in the nation by ESPN in the Class of 2021. In his lone year on campus in Tuscaloosa, he played 25.8 minutes per game mainly coming off the bench in a deep frontcourt rotation for the Tide, and average 8.5 points, 4.8 rebounds, 4.3 assists, and a steal in 25.8 minutes per game.

    At 6-foot-2, 190 pounds, Davison’s carrying trait is his athleticism, which he displayed on both sides of the ball as a dynamic driver and aggressive defender. On top of that, he’s shown flashes of being a high-level passer as well. His shot is still somewhat of a work in progress (33 percent on mid-range jumpers, 30.1 percent from three last season) but the 19-year-old does seem to be improving in that area.

  • G Alondes Williams, Wake Forest

    LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY - DECEMBER 29: Alondes Williams #31 of the Wake Forest Deacons against the Louisville Cardinals at KFC YUM! Center on December 29, 2021 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

    LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY – DECEMBER 29: Alondes Williams #31 of the Wake Forest Deacons against the Louisville Cardinals at KFC YUM! Center on December 29, 2021 in Louisville, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

    Williams is one of the older players in this draft at 23 years old. His college career began with two years at the Division-II level before transferring to Oklahoma, where he came off the bench for two seasons. Last season he transferred again and played a starring role for Wake Forest, averaging 18.5 points, 6.4 rebounds, 5.2 assists, and 1.2 steals in 34.1 minutes per game.

    At 6-foot-5, 210 pounds Williams is a fit for a team with a ‘position-less’ philosophy like the Celtics. He’s a true playmaker, and showed growth as a finisher at the rim last season. On defense, his size and athleticism allow him to guard multiple positions.

  • G Collin Gillespie, Villanova

    Feb 2, 2022; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Villanova Wildcats guard Collin Gillespie (2) shoots against Marquette Golden Eagles guard Tyler Kolek (22) during the first half at Fiserv Forum. Credit: Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports

    Feb 2, 2022; Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA; Villanova Wildcats guard Collin Gillespie (2) shoots against Marquette Golden Eagles guard Tyler Kolek (22) during the first half at Fiserv Forum. Credit: Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports

    If the Celtics are looking to add another pure shooter to their roster at this stage in the draft, they could turn to Gillespie. The two-time All-American and Big East Player of the Year shot 41.5 percent from deep last season on 277 attempts – the fourth-most in Division-I college basketball. In five years with the Wildcats, he shot 38.7 percent from deep. He might not offer much in terms of playmaking or defense, but could be a potential microwave scorer at the end of the bench.

  • G/F Julian Champagnie, St. John’s

    Feb 16, 2022; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; St. John's Red Storm guard Julian Champagnie (2) dribbles against Xavier Musketeers guard Colby Jones (3) in the second half at Cintas Center. Credit: Katie Stratman-USA TODAY Sports

    Feb 16, 2022; Cincinnati, Ohio, USA; St. John’s Red Storm guard Julian Champagnie (2) dribbles against Xavier Musketeers guard Colby Jones (3) in the second half at Cintas Center. Credit: Katie Stratman-USA TODAY Sports

    Staying in the Big East, Champagnie was in the running for conference Player of the Year in 2022, and was named First-Team All-Big East for the second year in a row. Another ‘position-less’ kind of player, Champagnie is a capable scorer from all three levels of the floor at 6-foot-8 and 215 pounds. Last year he ranked second in the Big East averaging 19.2 points per game on 41.4/33.7/78.1 percent shooting. The previous season he averaged 19.8 points per game.

    Champagnie is a well-rounded player who comes in with two years of starting experience at the age of 20. His size and scoring ability make him a potential mismatch player off the bench if his shot continues to develop.

  • F Jabari Walker, Colorado

    LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - MARCH 10: Jabari Walker #12 of the Colorado Buffaloes drives against Rivaldo Soares #11 of the Oregon Ducks during the Pac-12 Conference basketball tournament quarterfinals at T-Mobile Arena on March 10, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Buffaloes defeated the Ducks 80-69. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

    LAS VEGAS, NEVADA – MARCH 10: Jabari Walker #12 of the Colorado Buffaloes drives against Rivaldo Soares #11 of the Oregon Ducks during the Pac-12 Conference basketball tournament quarterfinals at T-Mobile Arena on March 10, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The Buffaloes defeated the Ducks 80-69. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

    Next up on the list of ‘position-less’ players in Walker. At 6-foot-8, 215 pounds he can play like a shooting guard, small forward, or power forward. He had a breakout year for Colorado last year, averaging 14.6 points and 9.4 rebounds in 28.1 minutes per game.

    Walker displayed a good touch from three in his two years in Boulder, shooting 39.9 percent from deep in 59 career games with the Buffaloes. He doesn’t have the same raw athleticism as some of the other players on this list, but makes up for that with good instincts and feel for the game.

  • F Peyton Watson, UCLA

    LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 25:  Peyton Watson #23 of the UCLA Bruins drives to the basket in the second half against the Arizona Wildcats at UCLA Pauley Pavilion on January 25, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)

    LOS ANGELES, CA – JANUARY 25: Peyton Watson #23 of the UCLA Bruins drives to the basket in the second half against the Arizona Wildcats at UCLA Pauley Pavilion on January 25, 2022 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images)

    Watson’s career path is similar to Davison. The 12th-ranked recruit in the Class of 2021, he stayed close to home at UCLA but found himself playing a more limited role off the bench. His playing time was more limited than Davison’s at just 12.7 minutes per game. Some experts were surprised to see him declare for the draft with such limited tape, and speculated he could end up a first-round pick if he stayed another year.

    Watson moves like a guard but measured in at 6-foot-8, 205 pounds. He has tremendous athletic upside, but as is to be expected with his lack of playing time in incredibly raw. A year in the G-League could help fast-track his development. Late in the second round, teams aren’t drafting players to make an immediate impact, and for a team like the Celtics a high-ceiling project player like Watson would make a lot of sense.

  • PF/C Trevion Williams, Purdue

    Purdue forward Trevion Williams (50) boxes out Indiana forward Race Thompson (25) during the first half of an NCAA men's basketball game, Saturday, March 5, 2022 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette.

    Purdue forward Trevion Williams (50) boxes out Indiana forward Race Thompson (25) during the first half of an NCAA men’s basketball game, Saturday, March 5, 2022 at Mackey Arena in West Lafayette. (Nikos Frazier/Journal & Courier/USA TODAY Network)

    As we saw in the NBA Finals, the Celtics have to change the way they operate when Robert Williams is not on the floor. Keeping him healthy and rested will be something the Celtics need to focus on moving forward, so adding another true big to the roster could be considered a need. That’s something the Celtics could address through free agency, but with teams not valuing true power forwards and centers as much as they used to, more talented and NBA-ready players at those positions can be found later in the draft.

    At Purdue, Trevion Williams was a physical presence underneath at 6-foot-10, 255 pounds. He proved to be a polished low-post scorer, with some passing ability as well. But the best part of his game is rebounding – he grabbed 7.4 rebounds in just 20.1 minutes per game for the Boilermakers last season. As a four-year player, his game is more advanced than some other players at the position. He could potentially come in and compete for deep rotation minutes as a rookie.

  • C Kofi Cockburn, Illinois

    Michigan State's Tyson Walker, right, offers extra coverage while helping out to guard Illinois' Kofi Cockburn during the second half on Saturday, Feb. 19, 2022, at the Breslin Center in East Lansing. (Nick King/Lansing State Journal/USA TODAY Network)

    Michigan State’s Tyson Walker, right, offers extra coverage while helping out to guard Illinois’ Kofi Cockburn during the second half on Saturday, Feb. 19, 2022, at the Breslin Center in East Lansing. (Nick King/Lansing State Journal/USA TODAY Network)

    Cockburn may be a bit of a reach at 53rd overall, but if the Celtics want a traditional big to add another paint presence he’d be worth it. At 7-foot-1, 285 pounds, Cockburn is an old-school center who will dominate under the rim but doesn’t offer much beyond that. He’s incredibly productive in his role, and averaged 20.9 points on 59.3 precent shooting with 10.6 rebounds and a block in 30.7 minutes per game as a junior for the Illini last season. That performance earned him consensus First-Team All-American honors, after being a second-team All-American last season. He’d be another option to help spell Robert Williams during the regular season.