Boston Bruins

The Boston Bruins were already seriously banged up going into Tuesday’s game against the Detroit Red Wings. They took a 5-3 loss on the scoreboard, but the defeat came at potentially a bigger cost.

Defenseman Hampus Lindholm became the latest Bruins player to exit a game with an injury on Tuesday night. Lindholm left after a shift late in the second period, then the Bruins later ruled him out during the third period with what they termed a lower-body injury.

Bruins head coach Bruce Cassidy was cautiously optimistic about Lindholm’s status when he spoke to reporters after the game.

“I don’t think it’s serious, but you don’t know better until you get better information,” Cassidy said on the Lindholm injury (via Shawn Hutcheon). It’s possible the Bruins merely held Lindholm out as a precautionary measure in a two-goal game and what amounted to a “scheduled loss.” Boston was also missing forwards David Pastrnak and Trent Frederic in the game, forcing Cassidy to shuffle his lineup for the second night of a back-to-back.

Lindholm had logged four assists in six games with the Bruins, while averaging 23:04 of ice time, prior to Tuesday. It’s likely the team has an update on Lindholm after more information is gathered at some point on Wednesday.

The Bruins are off until Friday, when they play the Tampa Bay Lightning at Amalie Arena.

Matt Dolloff is a writer and podcaster for 985TheSportsHub.com. Any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of 98.5 The Sports Hub, Beasley Media Group, or any subsidiaries. Have a news tip, question, or comment for Matt? Yell at him on Twitter @mattdolloff and follow him on Instagram @realmattdolloff. You can also email him at mdolloff@985thesportshub.com.


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  • Mar 3, 2022; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Boston Bruins left wing Brad Marchand (63) deflects the puck towards the Vegas Golden Knights zone during the second period at T-Mobile Arena. Mandatory Credit: Stephen R. Sylvanie-USA TODAY Sports

    Mar 3, 2022; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Boston Bruins left wing Brad Marchand (63) deflects the puck towards the Vegas Golden Knights zone during the second period at T-Mobile Arena. (Stephen R. Sylvanie/USA TODAY Sports)

    Do we have some more terrible Marchand discourse on the way?

    If you had an issue with Brad Marchand’s hit on Andrew Peeke, I truly do not know what to tell you.

    To be absolutely clear, I hate slow-motion GIFs being used as judgements for hits. (I still love Conor Ryan and you should subscribe to the BSJ for his Bruins coverage, but this is just my personal stance.) Slow-mo GIF replays of hits are borderline disinformation, really. While the slowed-down speed is designed to give the viewer the best angle possible, people tend to use it to try to determine intent on a play that went down at approximately 25 miles per hour. It’s just not the best way to view it.

    But slow it down, speed it up, and there’s nothing wrong with what Marchand did on this hit. Not a thing. There’s a loose puck and Peeke is making the decision to activate deeper into the offensive zone to make a potential scoring play on the puck. Every single defenseman who has ever made this decision at any level of hockey should be aware of the risk that comes with that. This is one area of the rink where you absolutely should expect a hit to come your way. There’s a price that’s often paid with those plays, even if it’s timed perfectly. Peeke paid the price to make a play, and it didn’t work out for him, as he took a heavy hit and helped spark Jake DeBrusk the other way for a breakaway goal as he struggled to get back to his feet.

    Scream suspension as loud as you’d like, and there’s still nothing there.

    I think our pal Mike From Woburn has summed it up best when referring to these people who do nothing but scream for suspensions as “Player Safety Fetishists.” It’s probably the closest thing hockey has to the proverbial internet mob. (Wait, it definitely is.) They don’t actually care about improving the game or the concept of player safety as a whole, they just have a fetish for playing judge, jury, and executioner. It seems a bit like rooting for the Death Star sometimes. Big time ‘suspend me harder, Parros!’ vibes from those weirdos.

    And with Marchand, I’m sure the hyperbole is on another level.

  • Apr 4, 2022; Columbus, Ohio, USA; Boston Bruins goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) plays the puck against the Columbus Blue Jackets in the first period at Nationwide Arena. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports

    Apr 4, 2022; Columbus, Ohio, USA; Boston Bruins goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) plays the puck against the Columbus Blue Jackets in the first period at Nationwide Arena. (Aaron Doster/USA TODAY Sports)

    Linus Ullmark is heating up for the Bruins

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    Because at the end of the day, the most important thing to note when it comes to Ullmark is that the Bruins have benefitted from the fact that they’ve yet to experience a stretch where both goalies were in the tank at the same time.

    With Swayman going through a slight (stressing the slight, so don’t freak out) dip in terms of his raw numbers and eye-test figures, which was bound to happen given how strong he performed upon his return to the NHL), Ullmark has provided the Bruins with some solid play. With a 5-0-0 record and .931 save percentage in six appearances since Mar. 15, Ullmark’s .931 save percentage actually ranks fourth-best among all NHL goaltenders over that span, and his 1.69 goals against average over that spell is second to only the Avalanche’s Darcy Kuemper (1.67) among goaltenders with at least five appearances.

    On the year, Ullmark is up to 22 wins in 33 decisions, and has certainly helped put the Bruins in this position as a viable threat with two fresh-but-not-exhausted goalies approaching a cramped schedule to close out the season and with seeding on the line.

  • Apr 4, 2022; Columbus, Ohio, USA; Columbus Blue Jackets goaltender Elvis Merzlikins (90) makes a save in net against Boston Bruins center Curtis Lazar (20) in the third period at Nationwide Arena. Mandatory Credit: Aaron Doster-USA TODAY Sports

    Apr 4, 2022; Columbus, Ohio, USA; Columbus Blue Jackets goaltender Elvis Merzlikins (90) makes a save in net against Boston Bruins center Curtis Lazar (20) in the third period at Nationwide Arena. (Aaron Doster/USA TODAY Sports)

    The Junk Drawer

    • More home-and-homes, please. Because these teams hate each other by the second game. I mean, honestly, anything to spice up a regular season game is A-OK in my book. I’ve said it once and I’ll say it again: Gimme more games against division and conference foes. I’d happily sacrifice seeing each non-conference at both home and road to make this happen. I absolutely know that’s easy for me, a Bruins person living in Massachusetts, to say, and I apologize to my displaced New England friends. I just miss divisions and conferences actually meaning something.
    • Defenseman Josh Brown drew back into action for the Bruins on Monday night. Brown suffered an upper-body injury last Thursday against the Devils and missed last Saturday’s meeting with the Jackets at TD Garden. The 6-foot-5 Brown finished Monday’s game with two hits and two blocked shots in 14:59 of time on ice.
    • One thing I don’t understand about moving: Where did all these shirts come from? I wear the same 15 shirts in an endless rotation. How did I come into possession of so many shirts? Someone take these shirts. (No, not the Jaromir Jagr one. I’m keeping that one.)
    • I’m curious how Taylor Hall would perform in a fastest skater competition.
    • Random Blue Jacket: Pascal Leclaire. Remember how Brady Anderson had that one year where he ate all his vegetables and hit like 50 home runs out of nowhere? Leclaire was basically that but in net. In 2007-08, Leclaire won 24 games and posted nine shutouts in 54 games for Columbus. He would go on to win just 20 games and record a staggering zero shutouts over the three seasons that followed before he was out of the league. Injuries proved to be a major obstacle.
    • This is actually just the second time that the Bruins have swept the season series with the Blue Jackets since they moved to the Eastern Conference in 2013. The first and only other time came back in 2013-14.

NEXT: The ‘Hampus Lindholm Effect’ sparks the Bruins