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Jan 21, 2021; Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Boston Bruins center Jack Studnicka (23) celebrates with center David Krejci (46) after scoring against the Philadelphia Flyers during the third period at the TD Garden. Mandatory Credit: Brian Fluharty-USA TODAY Sports

Make no mistake about it, the loss of David Krejci is a massive one for the Bruins.

A constant in the Bruins’ lineup for almost a decade and a half, having Krejci behind Patrice Bergeron on the Bruins’ depth chart has given the Black and Gold a one-two center punch that few teams have been able to best. Especially come postseason time, with Krejci being a two-time postseason-leading scorer (2011 and 2013), and with his 111 playoff points since 2010 tied with Bergeron tied for the fifth-most in the NHL, trailing only Sidney Crosby, Patrick Kane, Nikita Kucherov, and Geno Malkin.

Krejci remained effective in 2021, too, with eight goals and 44 points for the B’s, and another two goals and nine points in 11 postseason games. And the 35-year-old Krejci was undoubtedly revitalized upon the team’s acquisition of Taylor Hall, with the Krejci line looking and producing at its most dangerous since the days of Milan Lucic and Nathan Horton (and Jarome Iginla).

In fact, Krejci’s rates were near the top of the league, as his 2.47 assists per 60 minutes of all-situation play were the fifth-most among all NHL skaters with at least 800 minutes played. The only players with better rates? Leon Draisaitl (2.54), Nathan MacKinnon (2.82), Artemi Panarin (2.98), and Connor McDavid (3.42). Not the worst company.

So, yeah, don’t kid yourself. It’s a gigantic, gigantic loss for the Bruins.

And with no set-in-stone option set to step up into his spot and replace his production.

Ty Anderson is a writer and columnist for 985TheSportsHub.com. Any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of 98.5 The Sports Hub, Beasley Media Group, or any subsidiaries. Yell at him on Twitter: @_TyAnderson.