Bengals WR Tyler Boyd had a pretty outrageous take on his performance against Stephon Gilmore

David Kohl-USA TODAY

By Matt Dolloff, 985TheSportsHub.com

Patriots cornerback Stephon Gilmore absolutely dominated in a matchup against Bengals receiver Tyler Boyd, according to people with eyes and anyone who can read a box score. But somehow, some way, Boyd claims he got the best of the Pats' Defensive Player of the Year candidate.

“I won more of my one-on-ones,” Boyd said, via Bengals.com. “[The first interception] I had a curl and he was sitting on it. He sat under it.”

Boyd made a habit of deflecting blame for his performance in the Patriots' 34-13 win on Sunday. Boyd finished with three catches on seven targets for 26 yards while matched up most of the time against Gilmore, who finished with two interceptions, one of which he returned for a touchdown, and four pass breakups. Instead of just saying he needs to be better, Boyd ostensibly blamed Bengals QB Andy Dalton and head coach Zac Taylor.

On the pick-six, where Gilmore played off Boyd, read the route perfectly and jumped it easily, Boyd said: “He had the outside leverage on an out route to the field. Man coverage. You think it’s going to be a pick?”

Stephon Gilmore of the New England Patriots celebrates with teammates after intercepting a pass during the third quarter against the Cincinnati Bengals in the game at Paul Brown Stadium on December 15, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Bobby Ellis/Getty Images)
Stephon Gilmore of the New England Patriots celebrates with teammates after intercepting a pass during the third quarter against the Cincinnati Bengals in the game at Paul Brown Stadium on December 15, 2019 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Bobby Ellis/Getty Images)

"If you want to justify that he shut me down on those two plays, that's cool," Boyd added, via ESPN. "It's whatever. But if you go watch the tape, you'll see."

Part of what makes Gilmore so dangerous is that he has a unique ability to play a little bit off receivers in coverage as a way of "baiting" quarterbacks into thinking the receiver is open. It's a big part of how he made the pick-six happen. So maybe that's what Boyd was referring to when he acted like he was getting open.

Anyone with a reasonable bone in their body, however, knows who really won that matchup. And he did not wear orange and black.

Matt Dolloff is a digital producer for 985TheSportsHub.com. Any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of 98.5 The Sports Hub, Beasley Media Group, or any subsidiaries. Have a news tip, question, or comment for Matt? Follow him on Twitter @mattdolloff or email him at [email protected].