Boston Bruins

Apr 15, 2019; Toronto, Ontario, CAN: Toronto Maple Leafs forward Andreas Johnsson celebrates his goal as Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand and goaltender Tuukka Rask watch during the second period of game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Scotiabank Arena. (John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports)

Apr 15, 2019; Toronto, Ontario, CAN: Toronto Maple Leafs forward Andreas Johnsson celebrates his goal as Boston Bruins forward Brad Marchand and goaltender Tuukka Rask watch during the second period of game three of the first round of the 2019 Stanley Cup Playoffs at Scotiabank Arena. (John E. Sokolowski-USA TODAY Sports)

By Matt Dolloff, 985TheSportsHub.com

The Bruins faltered in the second period with three goals allowed to the Maple Leafs. They all started the same way – by giving the puck back to Toronto on defense.

Turnovers and unsuccessful breakout attempts ultimately doomed the Bruins in a 3-2 loss to the Leafs in Game 3, leaving them with a 2-1 series deficit. They need to figure out a way to combat the Leafs’ speed on the road, without the advantage of dictating matchups. On all three goals, the Bruins looked like they couldn’t keep up.

The Maple Leafs use their superior skating on the forecheck as much as they do with the puck. In Game 3, they consistently swarmed Bruins puck-carriers in their offensive zone, especially on the power play. And Toronto struck on both man advantages in the second period.

Toronto’s first goal came off a Bruins turnover in 5-on-5. Torey Krug attempted to corral a bouncing puck but lost it in his skates. Newly inserted fourth-line right wing Tyler Ennis picked it off and fired it toward the net, which set the scoring sequence in motion. Morgan Rielly’s shot from the half-boards slithered through Tuukka Rask’s pads, and Trevor Moore smacked home the loose puck to put the Leafs on the board.

Rask may catch some blame for letting that rebound through, but the play started with Krug losing control on a chance to clear.

The Toronto forecheck simply overwhelmed the Bruins 12 seconds into their second power play of the game. Mitch Marner and Andreas Johnsson both mugged Patrice Bergeron to knock the puck loose. The Bruins were left chasing from there, as Marner fed it to Johnsson who found an open Auston Matthews for the one-timer. The Leafs executed their forechecking and quick passing at an extraordinary pace here.

Brandon Carlo had a chance to reset the Leafs’ next power play. But John Tavares’ pressure chopped down his clearing attempt and Rielly easily kept the puck alive in the zone. In the corner against Steve Kampfer, Tavares flipped a brilliant backhand pass to Johnsson, who beat Bergeron to the puck and backhanded it over Rask’s shoulder.

When the Leafs had their chances down low, they turned it up another gear and burned the B’s in the end. On the two power play goals, they just had too much speed and skill to overcome with or without the puck.

The Maple Leafs are going to get their possessions and power play chances. But it’s on the Bruins to take better care of the puck when they have it. Puck management issues hurt them in Game 1, too. They’ll have to flip it again in Game 4 if they want to return to Boston at 2-2.

Matt Dolloff is a digital producer for 985TheSportsHub.com. Any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of 98.5 The Sports Hub, Beasley Media Group, or any subsidiaries. Have a news tip, question, or comment for Matt? Follow him on Twitter @mattdolloff or email him at matthew.dolloff@bbgi.com.