Boston Red Sox

Apparently, Hanley Ramirez doesn’t believe he did enough to keep himself healthy in recent years. Or maybe that’s how the Red Sox felt. But in any event, the first baseman is adopting a method that’s familiar to Red Sox fans with the hopes of playing at closer to 100 percent in 2018.

He’s adopted Tom Brady’s own TB12 method.

Ramirez revealed to reporters on Friday in Fort Myers that he’s switched to a program that’s in line with Brady’s methods of staying in shape and keeping himself more “pliable” as he gets older. Now 34 years old, Ramirez needs to work that much harder to stay fresh, much like the soon-to-be-41-year-old Brady. So he’s giving TB12 a try, and he’s dropped 15 pounds with it so far.

“Everything he says in the book and the work he does, it makes a lot of sense,” said Ramirez, via NESN. “I read his book and it’s working for me.”

The HR13 Method?

Hanley Ramirez breaks his bat in the third inning against the Houston Astros during Game 4 of the American League Division Series at Fenway Park on October 9, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Hanley Ramirez breaks his bat in the third inning against the Houston Astros during Game 4 of the American League Division Series at Fenway Park on October 9, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

Despite using the word “everything,” Ramirez isn’t exactly using everything in the book. But he expounded upon his use of resistance band training, which he believes has helped with his swing.

“When you’re young, you need the big muscles to get stronger,” Ramirez said. “When you get in that age past 30, you’ve got to concentrate now on the little muscles. You get that power from the big muscles. When you get hurt, most of the time those little muscles stop working. So, you’ve got to keep working on those little muscles, which is what those bands do. They give you resistance and keep the little muscles working.”

He’s also followed diet recommendations, but he doesn’t sound too thrilled about it. He has a guy who’s been keeping on him to stick to it.

“Can’t wait to fire him,” Ramirez quipped.

Will It Work?

Hopefully, Ramirez's adoption of the TB12 Method translates to not only better health and durability, but more power. He hit just 23 home runs with a .750 OPS in 2017, and he's sounding confident that he will get back over 30 in 2018. And do it with two healthy arms.

"Literally I was hitting with one arm last year and I hit 23 [homers]," said Ramirez, via MassLive’s Christopher Smith. “I know I can get 100 RBIs and 30 homers.”

Ramirez’s work with the TB12 Method better pay off. The Red Sox are absolutely going to need more power than they had in 2017, and he could very well be the biggest source of that improvement.

— By Matt Dolloff, 985TheSportsHub.com

Matt Dolloff is a digital producer for 985TheSportsHub.com. Any opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of 98.5 The Sports Hub, Beasley Media Group, or any subsidiaries. Have a news tip, question, or comment for Matt? Follow him on Twitter @mattdolloff or email him at matthew.dolloff@bbgi.com.